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Free Spirit Archive

Moltke As Philosopher

Rudolf Steiner, Literary Mercury, XII. Jg., No. 15, April 9, 1892
Google translate: German to English

MOLTKE AS PHILOSOPHER

It is always of particular interest to hear important people, whose sphere of life and activity is far removed from the field of theoretical consideration of the world, to speak about the great riddles of our existence and the ultimate causes of world development. And even a man like Moltke, who was often able to see fate run for entire states determined by his personality. The meaning of such a relation is known only to those who understand it, what great, deeply affecting experiences have to mean for our whole being, as they suddenly spread out a different color over a large number of our ideas. How many people are suddenly changed in their whole character by an experience of overwhelming impact! And worthless are the doctrinal minds of those people whose lives have never been affected by fatalities, high joys and deep disappointments.

What might have happened in the soul of Chief of Staff Moltke in hours before the important decisive battles with Austria and later with France!
In such moments something very special is spoken into the ear by the cosmic spirit; Words that are difficult to understand for people with workday experience.
It is now printed in the German reader world, as Moltke thought about world context and human destiny.

Let us seek to clarify the main features of his worldview. Moltke is convinced of the consistent law of the whole universe. He also believes that he may claim that the laws that cause the smallest and greatest events here on our earth are valid in every part of the universe. What happens on Sirius should be no less subject to the same reasons as the phenomena which occur daily before our eyes. And Moltke thinks of all human activity as being within the circle of this lawfulness. But our reason must also have this world-law in it; for only under this condition can she find rationality everywhere in the world. Coincidence of reason and reality is for Moltke a postulate of his views.
Ultimately, our philosophical general sees the whole world harmony as an outpouring of the divine Spirit, who has also established that world and human reason are in harmony.
Although these views coincide exactly with the mathematical-mechanical world-view prevalent in the circles of contemporary natural scholars-Du Bois-Reymond must be delighted with this Federal Cooperative-the thought seems correct

Moltke must be sought in his profession as a military leader the reason for the emergence of the same.
The commander's resolutions are, in the strictest sense of the word, the result of considerations based on mathematical and dynamic presuppositions. Just as the mathematician and mechanic only have an invoice result from given accounting approaches, so too only a very specific action can appear as the necessary consequence of given facts for the army commander. He implements this with a necessity, like that with which a stone falls to the ground. The activity of the human spirit appears here completely integrated into the mathematical-mechanical world event, as a mere continuation of it. And man proves to be the executor of eternal, universal laws of the world.

But what must necessarily suffer from such a view is the feeling for individuality and for the personal freedom of man. In the army leadership, without question, the individual must take a back seat, first against the laws of military knowledge, and secondly against the organization of a many-limbed body. Who draws a conclusion from such a field to the universal essence of all being, whose convictions must be one-sided. The psychologist, however, knows that every person who has a certain profession makes the latter the center of his world judgment. Everybody has the need to continually draw concrete examples from his experience to the general views which fill his mind. They are not merely meant to confirm the general, but to make it clear above all others.

It is now of course, that the general considered those laws as the general for which he finds examples within his world of experience. But these are the mathematical-mechanical ones. But what falls short in such a conclusion is the world of freedom. Within Moltke's views, space for the latter is as little a matter of space as it is of the mechanical world-view of contemporary natural science. What with the former the settling into military L? even and bustle, in the case of the latter, causes the one-sided view of the external event and the mathematical side of the nature of nature. Moltke regards the universe as a great troop body, the nature teachers of the present like a multi-unit machine. He generalizes the laws of martial art, these the rules of mechanics. In both ways a one-sidedness emerges in the fullest sense of the word, which can not be psychologically comprehensible, but can not exist before the forum of an all-encompassing view of life and the world. How necessary it is to measure every thing by its own measure, and not to bring in experiences from any other field, is one of the highest realizations of the human mind. To understand theoretically, to understand it, many people will, but from there to the transition into the innermost essence of our psychic organism is still a long way. Before you get to it, you have to have many experiences. Experiences that do not take place on the scene of world events, but in the depths of our interior. A philosopher is not the one who knows the sum of the existing philosophical doctrines and perhaps has multiplied them a few new ones, but only one who has undergone the heavy spiritual struggles, by which one does not learn truths, nor conceives, but experiences. What can least be learned and conceived, but what must be experienced, is the principle that every thing is to be regarded according to its indigenous individuality. This latter consideration is the necessary antithesis to Moltke's conception that a law goes through all world beings. Within this one lawfulness, however, innumerable kinds of law are possible, which are to be looked upon carefully in particular.

However interesting the views of the great general are for the psychologist, for they show how a strict integration into a sphere the basic characteristics of the latter as the leitmotifs of a whole Human life, and that the life of the reader can not be otherwise actuated than that of the thinker, who is not particularly dedicated to details, and who is equally warm and cool and contemplating.

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1887-1900 Collected Essays from Rudolf Steiner's Philosophy Of Freedom Period

"At the back of my mind there always lurked this question: how could the epoch be persuaded to accept the ideas of The Philosophy of Freedom? If you are prepared to take the trouble, you will find that everything I wrote for the Magazin für Literatur is imbued with the spirit of The Philosophy of Freedom." Rudolf Steiner 

The essays in this volume are divided into four main sections: The first part contains Rudolf Steiner's contributions to the daily politics of the "Deutsche Wochenschrift" (Vienna 1888), which represented the national interests of Germany in Austria.

The second part contains cultural and contemporary articles, which Rudolf Steiner wrote especially for the "Magazin für Literatur" published by him in Berlin.

In the third part, Rudolf Steiner's contributions on Nietzsche and the Nietzsche Archive are compiled.

The fourth part contains smaller book reviews and various other contributions.

CONTENTS Source of the journals pages 716/717

PDF download link (German)

I

Essays from "German weekly" 1888, VI. vintage

The week, December 30, 1887-5. January 1888, No. 1. , 17
DieWoche, fifth-ll.Januarl888, No.2 20
The week, 12.-18. January 1888, No. 3 22
The week, 18.-24. January 1888, No. 4 26
The week, 25.-31. January 1888, No. 5 30
The week, 1.-7. February 1888, No. 6 39
The week, 8.-15. February 1888, No. 7 43
The week, 15.-22. February 1888, No. 8 47
The week, 22.-29. February 1888, No. 9 50
The week, 1.-7. March 1888, No. 10 53
The week, 7.-14. March 1888, No. 11 56
The week, 14.-21. March 1888, No. 12 62
The week, 22.-28. March 1888, No. 13 64
The week, March 29-4. April 1888, No. 14 67
The week, 5.-11. April 1888, No. 15 70
The week, 11.-18. April 1888, No. 16 74
The week, 18.-25. April 1888, No. 17 76
The week, April 26th-2. May 1888, No. 18 78
The week, 3.-10. May 1888, No. 19 80
The week, 11.-16. May 1888, no. 20 82
The week, 17.-23. May 1888, No. 21 85
The week, 23.-30. May 1888, No. 22 88
The week, May 31 -6. June 1888, No. 23 90
The week, 6.-13. June 1888, No. 24 93
The week, 14.-20. June 1888, No. 25 96
The Week, June 21-27, 1988, No. 26 ........ 99
The week, June 28-4. July 1888, No. 27 102
The week, 5.-11. July 1888, No. 28 105
The week, 11.-18. July 1888, no. 29 108
The German national thing in Austria. The parlamen
Tarische representation of the Germans .111
German weekly 1888, VI. Jg., No. 22
The German national thing in Austria. The Germans
Clericals and their friends 116
German weekly 1888, VI. Jg., No. 25
The German education system (in Austria) and Mr.
vonGautsch 121
German weekly 1888, VI. Gen., No. 23
Monsignor Greuter 127
German weekly 1888, VI. Jg., No. 26
The Emperor's words 130
German weekly 1888, VI. Jg., No. 26
Papacy and Liberalism 134
German weekly 1888, VI Jg., No. 28
The Germans in Austria and their next tasks 139 Deutsche Wochenschrift 1888, VI. Jg., No. 29

II

Cultural and contemporary articles, which Rudolf Steiner wrote especially for the "Magazin für Literatur" published by him in Berlin.


General Assembly of the Goethe Society 149
Chronicle of the Vienna Goethe-Verein, V. Band, 6th ed., No. 5, May 25, 1891

Moltke As Philosopher 154
Literary Mercury, XII. Jg., No. 15, April 9, 1892

Maximilian Harden "Apostate" 158
Literary Mercury, Xu. Gen., No. 27, 2 July 1892

A "Society For Ethical Culture" in Germany. .164
Literary Mercury, XII. Jg., No. 40, October 10, 1892

A "Society for Ethical Culture" 169
The Future, Volume I, No. 5, October 29, 1892

J.M.Bosch "Human Compassion" A contribution to the foundation of Scientific Ethics 176
Literary Mercury, XII. Jg., No. 50, December 17, 1892

Adolf Gerecke "The Hopelessness Of Morality" 177
Literary Mercury, XII. Jg., No. 51, December 24, 1892

Old And New Moral Concepts 180
The Future, II. Volume, No. 16, January 14, 1893

Grand Duchess Sophie of Saxony 187
Magazine for Literature, 66th year, No. 14, April 8, 1897

Catholicism And Progress 189
Magazine for Literature, 66th year, No. 37, 18 September 1897

The Desire Of The Jews For Palestine 196
Magazine for Literature, 66th year, No., 38, 25 September 1897

Goethe Days in Weimar
Report on the 13th General Assembly of the Deutsche Goethe-Gesellschaft. , 20
Supplement to the Allgemeine Zeitung, No. 232, Oct. 14, 1897

Kuno Fischer on the Grand Duchess Sophie of Saxony 207 Magazine for Literature, 66th Y., No. 41, 16 October 1897

Goethe Days in Weimar. Report on the 13th General Assembly of the Deutsche Goethe-Gesellschaft. .212 Magazine for Literature, 66th ed., No. 42, October 23, 1897

Theodor Mommsen's letter to the Germans of Austria 214
Magazine for Literature, 66th year, No. 45, November 13, 1897

The daily conversation of today 217
Magazine for Literature, 66th year, no. 46, 20 November 1897

The instincts of the French 221
Magazine for Literature, 66th Y., No. 49, 11 December 1897

Emile Zola to the youth 225
Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 7, February 19, 1898

Zola's oath and the truth about Dreyfus 230
Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 9, March 5, 1898

Contemporary High School Reform 232
Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 9, March 5, 1898

University education and the requirements of the Ge
currently 235
Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 19, May 14, 1898

The Goethetag in Weimar. Report on the 14th General Assembly of the German Goethe-Gesellschaft. , 239 Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 24, 18 June 1898

The Social Question 247
Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 28, 16 July 1898
Freedom and Society 251
Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 29 and 30, 23 and 30 July 1898
Bismarck, the man of political success 263
Magazine for Literature, 67th Jg., No. 32, 13th August 1898
Friedrich Jodl «Essence and goals of the ethical movement
in Germany »272
Dramaturgical Sheets, 1st Gen., No. 32, 13 August 1898
Jules Michelet 274
Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 33, August 20, 1898
Literary Wisdom and Devil Island 276
Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 37, 17 September 1898
Dreyfus letters 277
Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 41, 15 October 1898
John Henry Mackay and Rudolf Steiner. The individuali
Stark Anarchism: An Opponent of «Propaganda of the
Did". Open Letter to Dr. Ing. Rudolf Steiner, Out
donor of the "Zeitschrift für Literatur" 281
Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 39, September 30, 1898
Answer to John Henry Mackay 283
Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 39, September 30, 1898
Correction 287
Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 41, 15 October 1898
Joseph Müller "Reform Catholicism" 288
Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 41, 15 October 1898
School and college 289
Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 49, 50, 3, 17 December 1898
College and Public Life 301
Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 50 and 51, 17 and 24 December 1898
Moritz von Egidy. Died on December 29, 1898. ,
Magazine for Literature, 68th Y., No. 2, January 14, 1899
On the problem of the journalist and critic. On the occasion of the death of Emil Schiff on January 23, 1899. , , Magazine for Literature, 68th Y., No. 5, 4 February 1899
Professor Schell 324
Magazine for Literature, 68th Y., No. 10, March 11, 1899
About the apprenticeship 327
Magazine for Literature, 68th Y., No. 11, 18 March 1899
The literature on the woman question 329
Magazine for Literature, 68th Y., No. 11, 18 March 1899
Heinrich von Treitschke «Politics» 335
Magazine for Literature, 68th Y., No. 11, 18 March 1899
Collegium logicum 337
Magazine for Literature, 68th year no. 12, 25th March 1899
Gutenberg's act as a landmark of cultural development. .341
German Book and Stone Printer 1900, 6th volume, No. 9
The printing art. To celebrate the five hundredth birthday
their creator's day 354
Magazine for Literature, 69th Y., No. 25, 23 June 1900
A monument 360
Magazine for Literature, 69th year, No. 40, 6 October 1900
Thomas Babington Macaulay. Born on Oct. 25, 1800 367 Magazine for Literature, 69th year, No. 42, October 20, 1900
Max Müller 373
Magazine for Literature, 69th year, No. 47, 24th November 1900
Ahasuerus 378
Magazine for Literature, 69th year, No. 35, September 1, 1900

Adolf Bartels, the literary historian 382
Communications from the Association for the Defense of Anti-Semitism, IL Jg., No. 37, September 11, 1901
The "Post" as a lawyer of the Germanic 387
Messages from the Association for the Defense of Anti-Semitism, IL Jg., No. 39, 25 September 1901
A Heine haters 388
Communications from the Association for the Defense of Anti-Semitism, IL Jg., No. 38, 18 September 1901
The Scientific Proof of the Anti-Semites 393
Messages from the Association for the Defense of Anti-Semitism, IL Jg., No. 40, October 2, 1901
Shameful anti-Semitism 398
Communications from the Association for the Defense of Anti-Semitism, IL Jg., No. 46-48, 13, 20 and 27 November
Two measures 414
Communications from the Association for the Defense of Anti-Semitism, ü. Jg., No. 50, December 11, 1901
Idealism against anti-Semitism 417
Communications from the Association for the Defense of Anti-Semitism, H. Jg., No. 52, 25 December 1901
Stefan von Czobel «The development of religious concepts
as the basis of a progressive religion »420
The Vähan 1901, Jg. III, No. 6

Seven letters from Fichte to Goethe. Two letters from Fichte to Schiller. With explanations by Rudolf Steiner 422 Goethe-Jahrbuch 1894, 15th volume

III

Rudolf Steiner's contributions on Nietzsche and the Nietzsche Archive. 


Nietzscheanism 453
Literary Mercury, XII. Gen., No. 14, April 2, 1892
Friedrich Nietzsche «So Spoke Zarathustra», IV. Part.
Recent publication from Nietzsche's estate. - A book
for all and none. Fourth and last part 460
Literary Mercury, XII. Gen., No. 24, June 11, 1892
Kurt Eisner «Psychopathia spiritualis. Friedrich Nietzsche
and the apostles of the future »467
Literary Mercury, XIII. Gen., No. 4, January 28, 1893
Communication and correction 469
Supplement to the Allgemeine Zeitung (Munich) No. 215 and 217, 17 and 24 September 1896
Nietzsche Archive 470
Hamburger Fremdenblatt, October 3, 1896
Nietzsche in pious illumination 471
Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 33, August 20, 1898
A real "disciple" Zarathustra 475
Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 43, October 29, 1898
Friedrich Nietzsche and the Berliner Tageblatt .... 479 Magazine for Literature, 69th year, No. 5, 3 February 1900
Friedrich Nietzsche as a poet of the modern world
Look 482
Magazine for Literature, 69th year, No. 49, 8 December 1900
Short excerpt from a lecture. About F. Nietzsche. , 486 Magazine for Literature, 69th year, No. 39, September 29, 1900
Friedrich Nietzsche, died on August 25, 1900. , , 489 Entertainment Sheet of the Forward, No. 165, August 28, 1900
Haeckel, Tolstoy and Nietzsche 497
Magazine for Literature, 70th Y., No. 45, 9 November 1901
The Nietzsche Archive and its charges against the previous editor. A revelation
I. The publication of Nietzsche's works 505
II. On the characteristics of Mrs. E. Förster-Nietzsche. .519
Magazine for Literature, 69th year, No. 6, February 10, 1900
The Second Coming of Nietzsche .... 529 A defense of Nietzsche's so-called "Second Coming". From Dr. E. Horn pepper
Magazine for Literature, 69th year, No. 15, April 14, 1900
Response to the above 538
Magazine for Literature, 69th year, No. 15, April 14, 1900
The so-called second coming of the same from Nietz
cal. A continuation of my reply to E. Horn
effers essay "A Defense of the so-called" Wie-
dergleich der Gleichen) by Nietzsche »549
Magazine for Literature, 69th Y., No. 16 and 17, 21 and 28 April 1900
Mrs. E. Förster-Nietzsche and her knight of funny shape. An answer to Dr. Seidl's "unmasking". , 571 The Society, XVI. Jg., Volume IL Issue 4, May 1900
594 response
The Future 1900, VIII Jg., 31st Volume, No. 33
Letter from Rudolf Steiner to Elisabeth Förster-Nietzsche. , 598
The alleged "fight for the Nietzsche edition". .601 Magazine for Literature, 69th year, No. 27, 7 July 1900

IV

Smaller book reviews and various other contributions.

IV
C. Andresen "The Development of Man" .... 617 Literary Mercury, XL, no. 40, October 3, 1891
Jürgen Bona Meyer «Temperament and temperament
treatment »618
Literary Mercury, XI. Jg., No. 41, October 10, 1891
E. Kulke «On the evolution of opinions» 619
Literary Mercury, XII. Gen., No. 2, January 9, 1892
E. Martig "Psychological Psychology with Application
on education »621
Literary Mercury, XII. Jg., No. 12, March 19, 1892
Franz Lauczizky «Textbook of Logic» 622
Literary Mercury, XII. Gen., No. 9, February 27, 1892
Dr. R. Biese «Principles of Modern Humanity Education» 623
Literary Mercury, XII. Gen., No. 37, September 10, 1892
Prof. Dr. Kirchner «Green Germany». A ramble
by the recent German poetry 626
Literary Mercury, XIII. Gen., No. 32, August 19, 1893
Woldemar von Biedermann 628
Magazine for Literature, 66th Y., No. 11, 18 March 1897
To our readers 629
Magazine for Literature, 66th year, No. 27, 10 July 1897
Alfred von Arneth 630
Magazine for Literature, 66th year, no. 32, 14th August 1897
Henry George 631
Magazine for Literature, 66th year, No. 44, 6 November 1897
announcement 632
Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 1, 8 January 1898
A letter from Blaise Pascal 633
Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 10, March 12, 1898
Karl Biedermann «The First German Parliament» .... 634
Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 14, April 9, 1898
Dr. Kurella «Socialism in England» 635
Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 18, May 7, 1898
Science and Press 635
Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 20, 21 May 1898
About popular university courses 636
Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 30, July 30, 1898
Heinrich Kiepert 638
Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 31, 6th August 1898
To the lecture of Prof. Pietzker about "Naturwissen
academic instruction »639
Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 41, 15 October 1898
Louis Dollivet "Rooms Juif!" 640
Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 43, October 29, 1898
Moriz Lazarus "Ethics of Judaism" 640
Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 43, October 29, 1898
Announcement for the year 1899 641
Magazine for Literature, 68th Y., No. 1, 7 January 1899
Eduard Samson. Died on 2 May 1899 642
Magazine for Literature, 68th Y., No. 19, May 13, 1899
Postscript to an essay «begins the 19th century
with the coming New Year's Day? »643
Magazine for Literature, 68th Y., No. 50, 16 December 1899
Lecture by Karl Lamprecht 646
Magazine for Literature, 69th year, No. 4, January 27, 1900
Ernst goal «from today». Thoughts on the threshold of
century 647
Magazine for Literature, 69th year, No. 10, March 10, 1900
Against the "Lex Heinze" 651
Magazine for Literature, 69th year, No. 10, March 10, 1900
Lex Heinze 652
Magazine for Literature, 69th Y., No. 21, May 26, 1900

ATTACHMENT
The Goethetage in Weimar 655
Vmtl. Weimar newspaper 1897
School and College 660
Magazine for Literature, 67th Y., No. 49, December 10, 1898
University education and public life 661
Autoreferat, leaflet [December 1898]
Information from the publisher
To this issue 665
Notes on text 667
Name Index 703
References of journals 716
Overview of the Rudolf Steiner Complete Edition. , , 719

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